guinguette

[noun]

A sort of outdoor tavern that once existed in the in the suburbs of Paris

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

Visuals for guinguette

Examples For guinguette

Pierre Auguste Renoir captured the carefree revelry of an afternoon at a guinguette in his "Luncheon of the Boating Party."

ELEANOR BEARDSLEY: Its Sunday afternoon at a guinguette called Chez Gegene.

Mr. OCTAVE BLANCHARD: (Through translator) We love the guinguette tradition and we come often.

Mr. OCTAVE BLANCHARD: (Through translator) We love the guinguette tradition and we come often.

Pierre Auguste Renoir captured the carefree revelry of an afternoon at a guinguette in his "Luncheon of the Boating Party."

(Soundbite of music) Unidentified Man: (Singing in French language) BEARDSLEY: The older patrons are hoping that Ferrer and others from the younger generation will continue coming to the banks of the Marne and keep the guinguette tradition alive.

(Soundbite of music) Unidentified Man: (Singing in French language) BEARDSLEY: The older patrons are hoping that Ferrer and others from the younger generation will continue coming to the banks of the Marne and keep the guinguette tradition alive.

ELEANOR BEARDSLEY: Its Sunday afternoon at a guinguette called Chez Gegene.

We dined that night al fresco at a guinguette, a wine shop just on the edge of the city, with stout Monsieur Panard and wiry Fagan, his collaborator, and with Monsieur Biancolelli, a few unmarried members of the company de la foire, and one or two other performers of the Theatre Italien.

We dined that night al fresco at a guinguette, a wine shop just on the edge of the city, with stout Monsieur Panard and wiry Fagan, his collaborator, and with Monsieur Biancolelli, a few unmarried members of the company de la foire, and one or two other performers of the Theatre Italien.

Wikipedia

From Wikipedia

Guinguette atmosphere in the Déjeuner de Canotiers of Auguste Renoir
La guinguette, Vincent van Gogh.

Guinguettes were popular drinking establishments located in the suburbs of Paris and other cities in France. Guinguettes would also serve as restaurants and, often, as dance venues. The origin of the term comes from guinguet, indicating a sour white light local wine. The 1750 Dictionnaire de la langue française, defined Guinguette as a "Small cabaret in the suburbs and the surrounds of Paris, where craftsmen drink in the summer and on Sundays and on Festival days. This term is new. It comes apparently from what are sold in these cabarets: a sour light local green wine, that is called ginguet, such as found around Paris." A Goguette was a similar kind of establishment.

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